Concussion Education Videos Courtesy of "Head Games"

Visit the Head Games website for more information.

Dr. Doug Smith, Director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, explains the anatomy of a concussion. “It’s called mild traumatic brain injury, but there’s nothing mild about it.”


Dr. H. Hunt Batjer, Co-Chair of the NFL Head, Neck and Spine Committee, explains the causes, symptoms and long term effects of concussions.


Dr. David Dodick, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo School of Medicine explains that heading the ball in soccer can cause concussion.


Dr. Doug Smith, Director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, explains that you don't need to lose consciousness to have a concussion.


Dr. Laura Balcer, Professor of Neurology, NYU School of Medicine, says that after three concussions, athletes should consider retiring.


Dr. David Dodick, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo School of Medicine explains why females are more at risk for concussion than their male counterparts.


Dr. Willie Stewart, Consultant Neuropathologist at Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, discusses the need for a worldwide conversation on concussions.


Dr. David Dodick, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo School of Medicine explains how repetitive head trauma can lead to a spinal cord disorder like ALS.


Dr. Christina Master, Pediatrician and Sports Medicine Specialist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, explains that factors such as having developing brains contribute to longer recovery times in children than adults.


Dr. Robert Cantu, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University School of Medicine, explains how children' s brains and bodies are different than those of adults, highlighting the need to reform youth sports.


Dr. Christina Master, Pediatrician and Sports Medicine Specialist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses the difficulties of spotting a concussion from the sidelines, emphasizing the need for an objective remove from play tool as well as concussion education for athletes.


Chris Nowinski, author of Head Games, explains why only having a Return to Play concussion protocol addresses just half the problem.


Dr. Robert Cantu, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University School of Medicine, explains the risks of continuing to play with a concussion.


Dr. Christina Master, Pediatrician and Sports Medicine Specialist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, explains Second Impact Syndrome, a rare but fatal consequence of failing to remove a concussed athlete from play.


Although the rest of the world has recently become more cautious in handling concussions, Dr. Barry O'Driscoll, who served as the International Rugby Board Medical Chief from 1997-2012, points out that rugby has adopted an increasingly lax concussion policy.


Dr. David Dodick, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo School of Medicine, discusses the need for rapid, objective, reliable sideline concussion tests.


Dr. Christina Master, Pediatrician and Sports Medicine Specialist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, explains that cognitive rest is key to recovering from a concussion.


Dr. Christina Master, Pediatrician and Sports Medicine Specialist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, explains that student athletes need to overcome the hurdle of returning to school before they can return to play.


Dr. Robert Cantu, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University School of Medicine, discusses Post Concussion Syndrome, or concussion symptoms that persist for more than one month.


After former Philadelphia Flyers’ player Keith Primeau’s last concussion, he experienced six straight weeks of symptoms. Post Concussion Syndrome leaves Primeau dealing with symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, difficulty with vision and irritability for years following his most recent concussion.


Girls’ soccer players report more concussions than boys’ soccer players and seem to recover more slowly. Olympic gold medalist Cindy Parlow still feels the effects of concussions that forced her into retirement.